Friend of our site


MMA Headlines


UFC HP


Bleacher Report


MMA Fighting


MMA Torch


MMA Weekly


Sherdog (News)


Sherdog (Articles)


Liver Kick


MMA Junkie


MMA Mania


Bloody Elbow


MMA Ratings


Rating Fights


Yahoo MMA Blog


Search this site



Latest Articles


News Corner


MMA Rising


Audio Corner


Oddscast


MMA Dude Bro


Sherdog Radio


Eddie Goldman


Liver Kick Radio


Video Corner


Fight Hub


Special thanks to...

Link Rolodex

Site Index


To access our list of posting topics and archives, click here.

Friend of our site


Buy and sell MMA photos at MMA Prints

Site feedback


Fox Sports: "Zach Arnold's Fight Opinion site is one of the best spots on the Web for thought-provoking MMA pieces."

« | Home | »

Sunday news review: Defending UFC 78’s main event

By Zach Arnold | November 11, 2007

Print Friendly and PDF

Hikaru Sato vs. Josh Barnett was announced by Pancrase for the promotion’s 12/22 Differ Ariake show in Tokyo. The fight will be under catch wrestling rules (two 5-minute rounds). Sato seems interested in costume play.

Dana White defending the booking of Michael Bisping vs. Rashad Evans:

“Chuck Liddell is the biggest superstar in mixed martial arts and there is nobody close to him in terms of popularity,” White said. “But after him, these guys are as big as anybody. They’re the winners from Seasons 2 and 3 of The Ultimate Fighter. That is huge. They’ve been on TV many times. People know them. People like them.

“They’re undefeated. They have things to prove. This is a great main event, if you ask me.”

Franklin McNeil in the Newark Star-Ledger:

But Ortiz never reached a contractual agreement with UFC president Dana White, so Saturday night, when Evans steps into the Octagon at the Prudential Center, he won’t be facing the 32-year-old former champion. Instead, Evans (15-0-1) will confront a fellow undefeated fighter just as determined and possibly more dangerous than Ortiz — Michael Bisping.

Speaking of Tito Ortiz, he held a seminar in Edmonton yesterday.

Akebono at Yokota Air Base. Plus, the latest fallout over the death of Takashi Saito. (Hat tip: Mikeinformer.)

Gladiator Challenge fighter Bobby Suggs killed his girlfriend and then committed suicide afterwards.

I really hate Splogs. Our site is a definite target of them.

A Judo event called The Maine Skirmish.

Raving about Kimbo Slice. More EXC show thoughts here and here. Local event coverage in the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Steve Sievert says the show drew over 6,500 paid. There’s also this item from Steve:

While the two shots from Slice did some damage, it was clear that Cantrell, who reportedly threw up in his dressing room before the bout, would rather have been elsewhere. Shaw revealed after the fight that EliteXC received anonymous phone calls on both Friday and Saturday calling into question Cantrell’s health and whether he was fit to fight. Ultimately, he was cleared by doctors to step into the cage.

Cantrell recently fought Brad Imes…

A new MMA school based on Bas Rutten’s MMA system.

Topics: Canada, Japan, Media, MMA, Pancrase, Pro Elite, UFC, Zach Arnold | 44 Comments » | Permalink | Trackback |

44 Responses to “Sunday news review: Defending UFC 78’s main event”

  1. Jim Allcorn says:

    Bo knows fear.

    Even the early Mike Tyson’s foes displayed more heart, determination & fighting spirit than Cantell did last night. And that’s not meant as a compliment toward Kimbo, but as a critique of Bo Cantrell. Who has now accomplished the notable feat of surpassing Bruce Seldon as far as the most gutless performance I’ve ever witnessed in 31 years of avidly ( some might say fanatically ) watching combat sports.

  2. Jim Allcorn says:

    And yes, I have fought myself, so I know what it takes to climb into the ring & face another man intent on doing you as much harm as legally possible. I was no great shakes, but I’m proud as hell of my mediocre 17-5 record. And I just can not imagine someone like Cantrell enering the cage having had 20 pro fights ( & actually calling himself a former “champion” ) giving THAT pathetic of a performance!

    I don’t care care what his excuse is, he was pathetic & he really ought to be ashamed of himself this morning. With that big buff physique & all those tats & such, he exemplified the saying ” looks like Tarzan, fights like Jane”. Though I’m certain that Edgar Rice Burroughs’ character would have lasted longer than Cantrell did …

    And what about the Marine Corps?

    They must be proud as hell as one of their products, huh?
    Somehow I doubt they want Bo associating himself with them any longer after last night’s debacle. Hell, I’m not all that high on Dana & the boys WEC poster boy Brian Stann, but damn, I’d have MUCH rather seen him in their with Kimbo last night.

    He’d have been horribly outsized, but I’ll give him credit, based on what I’ve seen of his attitude & intecity in the octagon thus far, there’s no way he’d have gone down without a fight like his fellow leatherneck Cantrell. Hell, for all we really know about Kimbo, Stann just might come out the winner despite the size disparity.

    Gary Shaw had better put all further notions of making any more “showcase” fights for Kimbo like last night’s ugly affair & put his time & money toward finding opponents who’re capable of showing us whether Kimbo can actually fight or not. Otherwise he runs the risk of putting Elite XC’s integrity as a legit, world class MMA organization to question.

  3. 45 Huddle says:

    A few funny notes about last nights EliteXC Show.

    1. Gary Shaw created the 160 lbs weight division to make a champion out of Nick Diaz. The creation of that weight class was BS enough, but his reasoning was that the weight cut was just to extreme from 170 lbs to 155 lbs. Yet, the naturally smaller fighter (Noons), who looked like he could easily make the real Lightweight Weight Class, destroyed the natural taller and bigger Nick Diaz. Basically making Shaw look like an even bigger fool then he already was.

    2. EliteXC has stated that they are about the fighters competing wherever they wanted and that they wanted to make “real” world champions. Yet, when Mike Pyle refuses to sign a contract extension, they make his fight with Jake Shields a non-title fight. That feels extremely Zuffa-esque. In terms of a business move, Gary Shaw was extremely smart for doing this. But let’s cut the bull. He bashes Zuffa for their business practices, and then does the same thing. There is a REASON why Zuffa has to have guys sign with them with 1 fight left on their contracts.

    3. Nick Diaz continues to prove why he is (in my opinion) the most over rated fighter in MMA. The guy has a career record of 15-7. He continues to lose fights and is completely disrespectful in defeat. Perhaps for the trailer trash that watches him, he is some sort of folk hero. But to me, he is nothing more then gate keeper to find out who is actually a contender in this sport (the out of shape Gomi fight excluded).

    4. The Kimbo fight was nothing more then a freakshow. Reminded me of the old Pride days.

    5. Jake Shields is extremely talented, but what a waste it is for him to sign a long term contract with EliteXC. Wouldn’t it be nice to see him fight Hughes, GSP, Fitch, or some of the other fantastic guys the UFC has at that weight class?

  4. Jim Allcorn says:

    One individual whom I feel compelled to give props to is Bill Goldburg.

    Honestly, I couldn’t stand him as a performer in either WCW or the WWE.

    During his stint with the WCW, I always saw him as Ted Turner & co.’s poor attempt at creating their own “Stone Cold” Steve Austin character. Which was a very poor attempt indeed, because he was an unconvincing worker & his Mike skills sucked. Therefore, his popularity with the fans never ceased to puzzle me.

    As for his period with the WWE, the less said about that the better …

    So, when it was announced that he was going to be a big part of EXC’s broadcast team, I was incredulous. I thought he was going to be a complete disaster. But, surprisingly, over the course of the past several months & EXC’s first handful of shows, he’s become one of their biggest assets IMO.

    I’ve been impressed with his work thus far & last night’s job was ,by far, his best work yet.

    When it came to Kimbo & his “fight” who’d have thought that a former “sports entertainer” would be the one member of the broadcast team who maintained his journalistic integrity? He refused to be a mark for what he saw take place & didn’t do anything to sell it to the audience either.

    Plus, I like the way he handled the aftermath of the KJ Noons – Diaz match too. He took control of the situation well I thought.

    I gained a lot of respect for him & his work last night.

  5. Cantrell was on a 4 straight KO loss streak. His head was mush, much like a QB’s head after multiple concussions. Add in the fact that he was sick, bad choice by ProElite.

  6. Preach says:

    Huddle, it was Pyle who wanted the fight NOT to be a title match, as he stated in an Interview with MMA Weekly last week: http://www.mmaweekly.com/absolutenm/templates/dailynews.asp?articleid=5006&zoneid=6

  7. The Gaijiin says:

    If you watch really closely – you can actually see Bo Cantrell endorsing his cheque while he’s lying on his face on the mat!

    Truly a talented individual.

  8. Matthew Watt says:

    Dana’s comments just reaffirm something I stronly believe: He is not doing a good job of marketing Rampage at all. Dana talks about how people love Chuck and Chuck is the biggest draw, well that may in fact be correct Dana. But when I see Rampage fight, I don’t see Chuck’s equal in the fan-friendly aspect, I see his superior. Lets do a quick head-to-head rundown of the 2:

    1. Rampage has a logging chain, Chuck has a mohawk with “cool” asian symbols (even)
    2. In after fight interviews Rampage makes people laugh, all Chuck does is say”ummm, yeah, i fought well, you know, it was a tough fight, and it was fun” (Rampage)
    3. Casual people are drawn to Rampage’s persona, his goofy grin, calm demeanor and hilarious outlook on life. Casual people would see Chuck and ask “what the f@$k is wrong with his hair”. (Rampage)
    4. Rampage before a fight would have everyone interviewing him howling and laughing, writers wanting to get more from him. Chuck has a writer writing down the same-old lines. (Rampage)

    That is 3-0-1 for Rampage

    This is not a knock on Chuck Liddell. I like watching Chuck fight, and if he jsut diversifies his gameplan more (he moved well against Jardine, it is just that he got right-hand happy, and Jardine made him pay for that), I think he may have some sucess. It is just Rampage is the most marketable star out there right now, an athlete that is just as great out of the ring as he is inside of it. And yet the UFC is doing nothing to make Rampage as big of a star as he should be.

  9. D. Capitated says:

    Chuck was a dominant champion and until Rampage begins to equal his dominance, the public will not accept him in the same light. They pushed Liddell as the face of the company as it rose up. They can’t just “do that again”. You only have one monumental rise.

    The only reason I haven’t outright said anywhere that Bo Cantrell took a dive is because I haven’t seen the sack of cash handed to him the night before in his hotel room. Some things quack and walk both like ducks.

  10. The Gaijiin says:

    I don’t think it was a “work” at all. I think you just had a guy who came in on short notice, wanted to collect a nice paycheck and had zero intentions of taking any kind of beating.

    To think that a company would have a work on a live event and in front of commission members & regulators is ridiculous.

  11. Jim Allcorn says:

    Oh absolutely, I agree. There’s really no need to actually arrange a work for someone like Kimbo. Not when you can dig up & bring in heartless, talentless individuals like Bo Cantrell.

    Regarding the UFC’s bungling thus far in their handling of Rampage, it’s a clear example of the poor business sense of allowing Dana White free reign to run the organization based on his personal relationships & emotional responses to people.

    Sure, it’s gotten them to where they are today, but what he’s built is beginning to show some definite cracks in the foundation. Just the sort of structural faults that could VERY costly to the UFC down the line IMO.

  12. Zack says:

    “when Mike Pyle refuses to sign a contract extension, they make his fight with Jake Shields a non-title fight. That feels extremely Zuffa-esque.”

    I completely disagree. First off, EXC still let Pyle fight. That’s risky, because he could’ve beaten one of their poster boys and then just left the organization. Also, the broadcasters discussed on the telecast how Mike Pyle was unhappy with how he was treated in EXC, you think Zuffa would ever allow that?

    Kimbo rules. It’s amazing how many people love him or hate him…and that’s what sells. I hope they continue to bring him along slow, keep him active, and have him be an ongoing undercard attraction.

  13. D. Capitated says:

    I don’t think it was a “work” at all. I think you just had a guy who came in on short notice, wanted to collect a nice paycheck and had zero intentions of taking any kind of beating.

    Who said anything about a “work”? I said he (may have perhaps possibly) had taken a dive.

  14. David says:

    Goodness, Mr. Arnold doesn’t acknowledge our comments. He must look at u s the same way I look at Sherdoggers…

    “If you watch really closely – you can actually see Bo Cantrell endorsing his cheque while he’s lying on his face on the mat!

    Truly a talented individual.” – Lol Gaijin.”

    Kimbo on his back will be a grim sight. Kimbo on his feet can make a can squeel. I enjoyed the short two hour event last night. EliteXC and ProElite are filling a much needed niche and anybody that wants to bash that can put all their time and money into promoting a non-mainstream sport and be criticized by all of the WWW.

    With more to say and memory that doesn’t serve that purpose, until next time.

  15. The Gaijin says:

    “Who said anything about a “work”? I said he (may have perhaps possibly) had taken a dive.”

    Work, dive – po-ta-toe, po-ta-toe…my point being I really don’t think there was anything “fishy” or “fixed” (i.e. Cantrell paid to lose). He just wanted to collect a paycheck for doing sweet fuck all, the least of which would be to absorb any punishment.

  16. dice says:

    Man do I hate to do this, but 45 huddle is correct when he is talking about the Pyle fight be a non title bout due to Elitexc.

    Zack and Preach are correct when they say it was Pyle who didn’t want it to be a title fight, unfortunately they don’t explain why. It was due to the “zuffa-esque”(as 45 put it) clause that if he won the title he would have had to sign an extension(if he didn’t then he would have been idle for awhile). Hence if Elitexc would not have had that clause or voided it , Pyle would have fought for the title. It was their choice to have that type of clause and in turn they should know that if they have a clause like that then it is going to make fighters apprehensive about fighting for a title.(who the hell wants to win a bunch of fights in a row, capture a title and then have to sign a long term agreement without being able to gauge their worth)

    This is a textbook example of why a lot of fighters are never able to find their “market value”. Grape knee is a poster who has had a lot of trouble grasping this concept as he thinks that fighters are able to go out into the “free market” and find their true worth. They are not able to, if pyle decided to fight for the title and won, then he would have had to sign an extension without knowing what competitors would have offered him. Its the same reason why Arlovski is hesitant about signing an extension with the UFC. He thinks he worth x amount of dollars, the UFC thinks he is worth less, but they have no intention of allowing themselves to be proven wrong by having arlovski receive offers from other orgs. The UFC is not the only one guilty of this business practice of course, the IFL is doing something very similar to Ben Rothwell.

    I think fighters are starting to get wise and are trying to avoid contracts that give them no leverage. You can see the beginnings of it with Kang (who wanted to still fight for Spirit MC) and Fedor (who wanted to continue his sambo career).

  17. The Gaijin says:

    http://mmamania.com/2007/11/11/ufc-quick-quote-wanderlei-silva-guilty-by-association/

    Happened to notice this as I was killing some time this afternoon. They did this with Team Punishment while Tito and Dana were having their snit as well, did they not?

  18. ilostmydog says:

    ^^^They didn’t let Salaverry wear ‘Team Punishment’ shorts for a fight IIRC.

  19. That elite show was so pathetic. I did see Randy Couture there tho! His guy got choked.. poor kid. Ok the kimbo thing. Geez you would think that was ME in there running for my life from them gold teeth. And right before Veterans day.. what a croc for this Marine. He should be ashamed. He has to be done in MMA no? Thanks Vern – http://Dan-Henderson.com

  20. klown says:

    Nick Diaz seemed slow and weak. I used to think he had the potential to get his act together but I think at this point we can classify him as mediocre.

  21. 45 Huddle says:

    dice is correct that fighters are starting to smarten up and demand better contracts. However, at the end of the day, very few companies offer these fighters really security. As much as Zuffa is the typical big company bully, they have been the best to fighters over the long haul.

    For example, one loss in the UFC is not the end of a fighters career. Guys like Tim Sylvia, Matt Hughes, Rich Franklin, BJ Penn, and many others have lost big time fights, only to be handed many more opportunities in the future. And not all of these opportunities came when they were superstars.

    A guy like Denis Kang might not have that luxury. K-1 doesn’t really rebuild fighters unless they have huge drawing power in Japan. Kang’s one loss could cost him for a year if not more.

    So fighters really have two choices right now:

    1. Fight outside of the UFC, but know that one loss can substantially decrease your earning potential.

    2. Fight in the UFC, get paid less then you should (unless you are a main eventer), but have a little more job security if the guys of Zuffa liken up to you.

    It’s a tough business to be in. That is for sure.

  22. sprewell rimz says:

    lol at the “ridiculous” 160 lb. division. did you guys ever watch PRIDE? that division was made explicitly because Hayato Sakurai could not make 154.

  23. Jonathan says:

    Overall, this card went off really well for the most part, and I enjoyed watching the stream. I think that you have to call this event a success, and for the most part, there was nothing to complain about. I was really happy with the production values and the speed at which the fights went off.

    As for the main event, I am pissed that I did not get to see an exciting fight, but overall, the only person to blame is Nick Diaz himself. He knows that he cuts like a stuck pig, and he needs to change or modify his fight style…his standing in front of people like a street fighter. Diaz may have the best chin in the world, but he needs to realize that you can lose by knockout OR cuts, and he has himself to blame for losing the fight (unless of course, you want to blame KJ Noons.)

    All in all, a solid car that was nothing but good for Pro Elite and Elite XC.

  24. The Gaijin says:

    “lol at the “ridiculous” 160 lb. division. did you guys ever watch PRIDE? that division was made explicitly because Hayato Sakurai could not make 154.”

    I believe someone “busted” that myth a while ago. It’s got a lot more to do with Japan (and the rest of the world) using the metric system (i.e. kilograms) than favouring one fighter’s (in)ability to make a certain weight.

    Weight limits at 160, 183 and 205lbs = 73, 83 and 93kgs.

  25. Michaelthebox says:

    Jim Allcorn: What bungling in the handling of Rampage? They can’t turn him into a star overnight, however much you want them to.

  26. sprewell rimz says:

    uh, genius, the metric system version of 155 would be 154. which is what Shooto has used FOREVER.

  27. D. Capitated says:

    Work, dive – po-ta-toe, po-ta-toe…my point being I really don’t think there was anything “fishy” or “fixed” (i.e. Cantrell paid to lose). He just wanted to collect a paycheck for doing sweet fuck all, the least of which would be to absorb any punishment.

    A work and a dive are two totally different things. People in works don’t often throw strikes full force at each other being that there is a mutual understanding that someone is set to lose and the other to win. Taking a dive means you’re intentionally dropping the fight, regardless of whether or not your opponent is aware. Some guys fake being competitive for awhile then fall late. Cantrell went the Seldon route.

  28. The Gaijin says:

    Thanks “genius”, as I will use that term loosely…that then buggers up the 10 kg increments doesn’t it?

    There’s no “unified world standard”, so just b/c the UFC was using it doesn’t mean it needs to be some type of worldwide practice. I’m pretty sure that the 10kg increments for weight divisions is far more credible than some ridiculous conspiracy theory like “Sakurai doesnt like cutting to 160”.

  29. The Gaijin says:

    *160=155

  30. sprewell rimz says:

    the PRIDE division was made up almost entirely of fighters from Shooto (Gomi, Hansen, Kawajiri, etc). they all previously fought at 154 lbs. they wanted to rebuild Sakurai after his horrible performances in Bushido, and the only place they had for him was Lightweight. he could not make 154, and could barely ever make 160 (check the Danzig fight when he came in at 164). they made the division 161 specifically for him to be able to make the cut. none of the other main fighters competed at 161.

  31. The Gaijin says:

    “A work and a dive are two totally different things. People in works don’t often throw strikes full force at each other being that there is a mutual understanding that someone is set to lose and the other to win. Taking a dive means you’re intentionally dropping the fight, regardless of whether or not your opponent is aware. Some guys fake being competitive for awhile then fall late. Cantrell went the Seldon route.”

    So we’re basically just sparring on semantics – you know what I meant. Either way, if Bo Cantrell was “taking a dive”, it was under his sole motivation to collect a paycheck and not get hurt.

    The one thing I’m not sure of is whether you’re implying that there was someone else involved in this “dive” or just that Cantrell didn’t feel like fighting and took the pussy way out. If it’s the former, as I’ve said before I’m inclined to disagree.

  32. The Gaijin says:

    “…they wanted to rebuild Sakurai after his horrible performances in Bushido, and the only place they had for him was Lightweight.”

    From my understanding of the business – Sakurai wasn’t really that big of a draw (Zach’s commented on this several times I believe) to the mainstream Japanese audience. If so, why would PRIDE build a division around resurrecting the career of a guy from another promotion, who really wasn’t going to be that big of a draw?

    And wasn’t the 160lb division supposed to have Gomi as it’s crown jewel?

  33. Sergio says:

    Sorry Gaijin, but I believe sprewell is correct in this case.

  34. sprewell rimz says:

    none of the Bushido fighters were big draws, Gomi included. they had Hayato Sakurai who was a reasonably popular guy, and he had shit the bed twice in Bushido. they needed to do SOMETHING with the guy, so they put him in with the young and exciting guys at LW. thus the 161 limit. ALL of the guys PRIDE used at LW were from other promotions, 90% of them from Shooto.

  35. sprewell rimz says:

    the 161 limit also led to most of the natural 154 guys becoming beasts, surely due to nothing more than taking their vitamins and lifting weights. check out the Gomi that fought Hansen compared to the one who fought Ishida.

  36. D. Capitated says:

    So we’re basically just sparring on semantics – you know what I meant. Either way, if Bo Cantrell was “taking a dive”, it was under his sole motivation to collect a paycheck and not get hurt.

    The one thing I’m not sure of is whether you’re implying that there was someone else involved in this “dive” or just that Cantrell didn’t feel like fighting and took the pussy way out. If it’s the former, as I’ve said before I’m inclined to disagree.

    Well, people who take dives usually try to do so in a fashion that does minimal damage to them. Sometimes you have a guy like Ray Lamotta who stands there and takes a beating in doing so. In any case, the end result is the same. Its not a “work” though. A worked fight is one that’s faked with both participants knowing. Lots of guys (probably most) have taken dives for fighters in the past with the fighter being blissfully unaware. Primo Carnera, anyone?

    Now, as for whether or not he was given extra incentive, I have no idea. I have a hard time believing some guy with 20 pro fights and who had been KOed legitimately before was so completely terrified of a guy with no licensed fights and who had lost one of his underground battles to a guy at least on his own level that he was too frightened to fight. Beating Kimbo was a meal ticket for him. Losing to Kimbo could have been too. We’re likely never to know.

  37. The Gaijin says:

    I guess I was off on that one then. As I said, someone commented here a few weeks ago saying that it was to do with my above comments (re: 73, 83, 93 kg classes).

    But I’m not about to be a douche and refuse to relent in the face of overwhelming evidence.

  38. The Gaijin says:

    “Now, as for whether or not he was given extra incentive, I have no idea. I have a hard time believing some guy with 20 pro fights and who had been KOed legitimately before was so completely terrified of a guy with no licensed fights and who had lost one of his underground battles to a guy at least on his own level that he was too frightened to fight. Beating Kimbo was a meal ticket for him. Losing to Kimbo could have been too. We’re likely never to know.”

    True – his performance last night had all but ensured he’s going to have a hard time getting booked on any legit cards. So maybe a loss like that might need to be worth a bit more than his “base pay”, maybe he got his own “shower room bonus”. But I was just looking at his recent record (0-4 and 3 by (t)KO) and taking into account the fact that he took the fight on about a week’s notice (and 2 weeks after his last loss). I just felt it was more an indication of him being underprepared, not wanting to get hurt and needed a paycheck.

    On the subject of Kimbo, like him or love him, he seems to have a pretty good following – that crowd was electric for him last night. And even though he has a thug persona, he seems to be taking the sport very seriously and after reading a bio on him he sounds to be a pretty smart guy (he was a high school football star that went to Miami U on an academic scholarship). He has some good natural ability and I think if he is brought along he could be a pretty decent pro, unfortunately his internet stardom will probably overshadow most of this.

  39. Grape Knee High says:

    Re: PRIDE and 161 lbs

    I think everyone is partially correct regarding how this weight class was formed.

    I don’t think Gaijin is completely wrong for saying that it has to do with the metric system. PRIDE already had their MW set at 93 kg (205 lbs). They already knew they wanted 2 lower weight classes when they formed Bushido, and it was convenient enough to set them at 10 kg increments: 83 kg (183 lbs) and 73 kgs (161 lbs). Shooto having previously had a 154 lb division obviously had little traction to PRIDE.

    That said, I’m sure it was very convenient that they could then use Sakurai at this 161 weight class. Gomi/Sakurai being popular or not, I recall PRIDE hauling out 4 Japanese fighters during one of their events as their “Bushido Aces”: Gomi, Sakurai, Minowa and some other guy I can’t remember at this moment (Chonan perhaps? — I’m sure someone remembers).

  40. Grape Knee High says:

    Poor Nick Diaz. There’s a phrase they use in baseball: “Million dollar arm, ten cent head.” If there were an equivalent phrase in MMA, it would be owned by Diaz.

    He just mailed in his performance yesterday: lackluster, telegraphed shots; impatient on the ground; and he somehow didn’t learn how to avoid the looping power punches after getting his face broken by Gomi.

  41. Jonathan says:

    Grape Knee High, your last comment was spot on about the “Pride Aces”. There is in fact a Computer Desktop Wallpaper made by DSE (Forever Live) featuring what they considered to be the “ace stars” in the Bushido series, and they were Hayato “Mach” Sakurai, Ryo “Pirahna” Chonan, Takanori “Fireball Kid” Gomi, and Minowman.

    Here is a link to the talked about wallpaper:
    http://photos-c.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sctm/v153/198/89/44007810/n44007810_31866342_7190.jpg

  42. Zack says:

    205 was formed for Tito Ortiz. What’s your point?

    This sport is still in its infancy. 10lb separations for lighter weights aren’t that big of a deal.

  43. D.Capitated says:

    Going to Miami on a football scholarship doesn’t mean one isn’t a thug. Miami is well known for recruiting kids from the street who aren’t very good at the 3 Rs, but are capable athletes.

  44. The Gaijin says:

    ^ I dont think you read it properly – he actually went to Miami on an ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP and didn’t even play football.

Comments

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture.
Anti-spam image